Tag Archives: Alexandre Dumas

Senserial Publishing – The Future of eBooks!

Introducing, something pretty cool! (By the wonderful people below):

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Okay, first off, I am saying right now that I will never post about something I do not personally love. Secondly, yes, I was approached by Senserial Publishing about this, but if I had not liked what I saw when I checked it out, I would NOT be recommending it to all of you. Finally, I am honestly really excited about this, and I think it could revolutionize the use of e-readers in how they are distinct from hard copies of books! In my opinion, I think this maintains the integrity and (dare I say) nearly sacred nature of the bound pages I actually prefer while truly utilizing the potential of the e-readers that so many people love. And here it is: Senserial Publishing (www.senserial.com) has developed a new way to read actual good books on an e-reader. Episodes are released every week, and if the ‘under construction’ visuals on their current page are any indication, it will be quite the reading experience! Famous authors like Charles Dickens, Alexandre Dumas and Charlotte Brontë (and too many more to count) all built up most of their fan base in this way and serialization is what TV dramas are based on today. Now a reader can have the thrill of experiencing an ‘episode’ of his or her favourite book from his or her favourite authors on Senserial, only with more promptness and better visuals than ever before!

But that’s not the only thing I love about this group’s idea. People have been serializing their novels on websites like WordPress or Wattpad ever since the common use of the Internet, and let’s be honest, there are some amazing writers out there who have never made it to actual paper-and-ink print. Senserial has a sister website, www.sennection.com, where writers and artists can collectively create and submit serialized MULTIMEDIA e-books to Senserial Publishing, and just like Wattpad, followers can search for their favourite authors and download what they write, as well as being kept up to date on any new material from these authors without having to search for it manually. In my opinion, this is the future of e-books.

And there’s a special treat in it for all of you! Right now, you can sign up for early access at the Senserial homepage (www.senserial.com) and get 6 free episodes of your choice, AND as an EXTRA special treat for my followers, once the website goes live anyone who has read about this here on my blog gets 25% off! For more information, check out this article by Mercy Pilkington, Senior Editor of Good e-Reader (http://goodereader.com/blog/e-book-news/new-platform-senserial-delivers-serialized-ebooks) and get out your e-readers, because this is going to be awesome!


Husband/Wife Book Reviews: ‘The Count of Monte Cristo’ by Alexandre Dumas (March 19th, 2015)

Re-posted from LiveJournal:

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As you can tell, since my last entry (basically about a year ago already!) in which I reviewed Bram Stoker’s Dracula, and was given the further assignment by my husband Graham to read Alexandre Dumas’ The Count of Monte Cristo, my copy of this beloved tome of over 1400 pages has seen some wear and tear. But it is now finished, and worth every single day I spent reading it!

The first Dumas book I ever read was an adapted version of The Knight of Maison-Rouge, which I do NOT recommend, especially as the adaptation I was unfortunate enough to read included such verbs as ‘electrified’ (as in ‘her presence electrified the silence’ or some similar usage) when CLEARLY, electricity was probably not discovered, let alone in such popular usage as to include in the lexicon of the average person. (Does anyone else get really annoyed by such anachronisms?) I would someday like to read a translated but NOT adapted version, as the story itself would have been interesting if it weren’t for grievous errors like those mentioned above. Needless to say, my first Dumas experience wasn’t as illustrious as his reputation had given it to be.

HOWEVER. I had seen the 2002 movie version of The Count of Monte Cristo,and had truly enjoyed it. I had also had the distinction of reading from cover to cover an unabridged version of Victor Hugo’s Les Miserables a few years previous, so I knew I was up to the task. I accepted, and thus my journey began.

Wait and hope: One of the last lines of this book basically describes the many facets of it, for those two elements are necessary for both revenge and redemption (two major themes of The Count of Monte Cristo). They are also important in every stage of a person’s life, which is so clearly seen in the life of poor Edmond Dantes. As a young sailor he waits and hopes for his chance to become captain and to marry Mercedes, the woman he loves. When that is all taken away from him, the fact that he has waited and hoped makes his disappointment even more palpable. While in prison with the intelligent Abbe Faria, he vows for revenge and this is what he waits and hopes for. When the Abbe dies and leaves his entire treasure to Dantes, he sets his desire for justice into action, but must wait and hope for each piece of his carefully constructed plan to fall into place. When his whirlwind of revenge begins to negatively affect the hopes and dreams of his young protege, Maximilian Morrel (the son of his former shipmaster), Edmond realizes that perhaps all he needs to wait and hope for is happiness, and after so much waiting and so much hoping, he seizes the day and sails off into the sunset with his new love, leaving Maximilian and his fiancee with a more positive form of his life motto of wait and hope

This book has everything. It has crime. It has romance. It has the dreams of the young crushed by the ambition of the powerful. It has murder, duels, intrigue, exotic locations, bandits, dandies, honour, luxury, and revenge, revenge, revenge! This book was originally serialized, which is why it was so long: it was so popular nobody wanted it to end! The Count of Monte Cristo was the popular TV drama of its day, and there are so many ways that modern shows have drawn from serialized works like it, I would be here all day if I tried to point them all out. All in all, I give this book 5 stars out of 5. It can be a bit daunting to carry around a hard copy like I did, so if you really can’t bring yourself to carry a book the size of a Bible around with you, please do get this on your e-reader. It will be worth your time, I promise you.


What I’m Reading – January 23rd, 2015

The first post on my YouTube channel, SharaLee Reads! (and yes I know my camera skills are terrible. Any hints would be most welcome!)