Tag Archives: Grace

‘Resurrection: Sanctifying Grace’ by Elizabeth Davies (March 7th, 2015)

Re-posted from LiveJournal:

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I have arrived, at last, to the conclusion of Elizabeth Davies’ Resurrection¬†trilogy, Sanctifying Grace. While I never did find out how it is that Grace can time-travel, and while I maintain that this trilogy should be advertised as a book in three parts instead of three books in a trilogy since none of them are able to stand alone as complete stories, I have to say that this trilogy was really good, and that the last book was my favourite.

Grace’s deteriorating health and consequent ‘demise’ had me in actual tears (usually enough to earn an extra star right there), and the double destiny of Roman & Grace (‘sanguinisto and regalato both’ as Davies puts it), was tied up excellently and with very few loose ends. I was curious why Viktor did not appear to recognize her when she first appeared outside Brecon Castle in the first book or why he never mentioned her first appearance to him while she was human, but I’m willing to chalk it up to the difference between her human and vampire forms, or that he didn’t want to tamper with destiny. Still, it was odd to me that he never would have once mentioned meeting her vampire form in the Dark Ages to Roman, even when he was feverishly trying to figure out if it would work to resurrect her somehow.

I liked that in this book, she is the one taking care of Roman instead of the sometimes ridiculous extent of her helpless female role in the other books (and when she is a helpless female in this book, it’s for the very understandable reason that she is dying of a brain tumour and merely the fact that she is female as well). After all the buildup and description of what life as Grace Llewellyn the Human With A Vampire Lover was like, I was kind of hoping for more adventures or even description as to what life as Grace the Vampire would be like, but I suppose that wouldn’t have been helpful for bringing the story to its conclusion.

As a trilogy, the first book has no ending, the second book has no beginning and no ending and the third book has no beginning, so these books seriously do depend on each other, and because they were marketed as three separate books, I found that to take away from the experience. As a whole story, this trilogy is really really good. I can tell a lot of research went into it, I loved all the characters as well as Davies’ writing style. 4 stars out of 5. Go read this! It’s good! (Warning for those who care to know: definite sex scenes – don’t read it if you don’t like that. Or better yet, read it but skip over those parts – the rest of the story is good too!)


‘Resurrection: Amazing Grace’ by Elizabeth Davies (February 21st, 2015)

Re-posted from LiveJournal:

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This is the second book in Elizabeth Davies’ Resurrection trilogy, and while still more interesting and well-written than most eBooks I have been unfortunate enough to read, I did not find it up to par with the first book in the trilogy, State of Grace. I truly enjoy the characters and the exploration of Brecon, Wales throughout various periods of history in this trilogy, but it is severely off-putting that the heroine, Grace Llewellyn, is constantly getting severely battered around (and not even seeking medical help!) without ever being able to properly fend for herself. I mean, she’s a pilot, right? Don’t you have to be really level-headed and focused to fly an aircraft? She’s really resourceful and sturdy, but would someone with the analytic skills required of a pilot really not look both ways when crossing an unknown street? I mean, yes, she’s been transported in this instance to 1873, but this basic safety principle has been ingrained in modern-day people since childhood, and would especially be put into effect by a person like Grace whose career involves piloting an aircraft. I mean sure, there are coordinates she must follow when flying, but she would also have to scan the sky at some point or other – she would be used to checking. There is no excuse for her to get run down by a horse because she didn’t look before she stepped out of an alleyway. And what was with refusing to go to a hospital when she returned from the 1700s??? Her collarbone was freaking BROKEN. I understand that she doesn’t want people to keep her in hospital because of her tumour, or to ask too many questions. But I mean, her consultant, Mr. Cunningham, is okay that she’s not in hospital, so if anyone had a problem with her leaving, she could refer them to him. She could explain her broken collarbone and bruising to thugs. They could be masked. The whole scene where Ianto smuggles her to London was basically just so Jeremiah could wipe her memory there. It was completely unnecessary. There could have been a better way to make that happen. However, I really do enjoy the time-travelling vampire romance idea, and I truly look forward to seeing if Grace will become a vampire or not, and if she and Roman will meet in their future. ¬†Also, it bothers me to no end that this book series is advertised as a trilogy, when in reality it is more like three volumes of the same book.
3 stars out of 5.