Tag Archives: The Cosmic Trilogy

Book Review – ‘The Cosmic Trilogy: Voyage to Venus’ by C.S. Lewis

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Voyage to Venus (originally published as Perelandra) is the second book in C.S. Lewis’ Cosmic Trilogy. Compared to the other two in the trilogy, this one best fits the mold of a ‘proper’ allegory. Ransom’s journey to Perelandra (known to us as the planet Venus), his subsequent enmity with the creature animating the body of his old rival, Weston, and their fight to either preserve (in Ransom’s case) or corrupt (in ‘Weston’s’) the integrity of the Green Lady, (Queen of Perelandra) during the absence of her husband the King is clearly tied to the struggle outlined in the Biblical book of Genesis between Eve and the Serpent. However, in this book, the idea is that the people of Earth (or Thulcandra) fell to the powers of the Evil One, but on Perelandra another planet’s Mother is given a chance at succeeding against temptation where she of Earth did not, as well as the results of that success. The idea carries through with a great deal of philosophical and theological dialogue back and forth. The dialogue between Ransom and the Evil One reads almost like a treatise in conversational form, and that between the King and Queen of Perelandra, the god Mars, the goddess Venus, and Ransom is clearly rooted in the tradition of Greek chorus. With its dense content and fine print, this book is a more difficult one to get through. It is not a light read. It is a fine piece of intellectual science fiction, especially for those interested in allegory or classical themes, but those looking for a novel will be searching in the wrong place. The next book in this trilogy, That Hideous Strength, is my favourite of the three, however, as it is allegorical like the first two, but also reads like a fantasy novel. It is easy when reading the third book to remember that this is the same man who gave the world The Chronicles of Narnia. The first two books in this trilogy, however, are more reminiscent of the Mere Christianity and The Great Divorce side of Lewis. More character development and description in this second book was nice. I can’t wait to reread the third. 🙂

3.5 stars out of 5


Book Review – The Cosmic Trilogy: Out of the Silent Planet by C.S. Lewis

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There are a lot of people who are either on one side of the spectrum or the other when it comes to this book, with not a lot of middle ground to spare. Some people love it because they love both science fiction and C.S. Lewis. Some people despise it because they feel his apologetics in this book are a tad lacking (especially compared to his non-fiction apologetics like Mere Christianity or The Problem of Pain) or that his prose and character development are a bit flat. I actually agree with both sides, and find it very difficult to say I do or do not like this book.
While I am not completely one way or the other when it comes to this book, I have actually read the entire trilogy, and compared to the other two (Perelandra and That Hideous Strength), this one is at the bottom of the list in clarity, elegance, function, and in just plain storytelling.  Lewis’ description is eloquent, and the introduction of other races is mildly interesting, but I felt as if I were reading an essay, or perhaps an article form of a rough draft idea for a sci-fi novel instead of that tying together of story and philosophy and theology that I so enjoy about everything else Lewis has written.

In this first volume of the trilogy, Ransom makes his way from Earth to Mars (or Malacandra) as a sort of crash-test dummy after he is captured on a walk by an old academic rival (Weston). They both end up on Malacandra together and we get to experience the consequences of men who choose to exploit and conquer versus those who choose to learn and love. We learn about Oyarsa (a Christ-like figure who, according to this trilogy, is in all worlds, but in different forms), and we learn that Oyarsa has a plan for Ransom’s future, even after he returns to Earth (or what the Malacandrans call Thulcandra) – enter the second book, Perelandra, which will be discussed in a future post.

The story stands on its own, which is very important in a series or a trilogy, but when all three books are read, the encompassing story arc tells us of our past, our present (or Lewis’ present, anyway – the second World War was on while he wrote most of these) and our future, not only here in the corporeal realm, or even in our own atmosphere, but in the spiritual realms and in all other realms as well. As a book, I give this volume 3 stars out of 5, but I have a much higher opinion of the trilogy as a whole. I would recommend familiarizing oneself with the Bible or some sort of basic level of Christian theology and end-of-days prophecy (especially closer to the end of the trilogy) as you read this, so you can really grasp the full extent of the allegory here, but the books as a set are also worth the read. Perhaps start with borrowing these from the library before you spend money on them, though. They’re not for everyone, though for those who enjoy them, they are certainly worth every penny and more.

Have you read anything by C.S. Lewis? What did you think of it? Happy reading, and be wary of trespassing on mad scientist academic rivals! (The consequences could be out of this world! 😉 )


Finally, An Update! (December 8th, 2013)

Written December 8th, 2013 and posted on LiveJournal:

Hello, friends!

The past month has been crazy busy, with obstetrician appointments, sleepless nights, baby preparations, and reading my first book for BTS Book Reviews,Firebolt by Adrienne Woods. I just submitted the review today and as primary reviewer, I will be published for certain in the January issue, which can be found at http://www.btsemag.com! I have also been writing the first few chapters of my own novel, which will be submitted by January 16th as the final assignment for the correspondence course I take via the Institute of Children’s Literature in West Redding, Connecticut, USA.

As soon as I listed myself as a book reviewer for BTS Book Reviews on LinkedIn, I was pleasantly surprised to be inundated with connection requests from fellow book reviewers and authors, some of whom have asked me to review their books. Jimmy Olsen sent me hard copies of three of his books: Things in Ditches,Poison Makers, and The Hero of Blind Pig Island, all of which I am looking forward to reading and reviewing first exclusively on this blog! Charie La Marr has also sent me a copy of her book Bumping Noses and Cherry Pie, and while I am currently up to my ears in books to review, if you have written a book and want an honest, constructive review for it, as well as a chance to be advertised, please contact me and I would love to do that for you! I will simply have to add you to my ever-growing list, but I will get that review done for you!

It’s amazing to me how quickly the ball started rolling for me after such a long dry spell in my writing, even in opportunities for me to write. I had an account on LinkedIn for almost a year with barely a notification before Myra Nour contacted me about BTS Book Reviews, but since I was accepted as a reviewer, I have had connection requests daily and have found an incredibly supportive circle of literary people who are willing to help out a newbie like myself. I have to say, the power of the Internet is astounding.

When my review for Firebolt (and subsequent books to be reviewed for BTS) is published, I can post the link to BTS Book Reviews here, but you’ll have to go to the website for the full review. Independently done reviews will be posted here in full as well as shared on Facebook and Twitter, reviewed on Goodreads and, if applicable, on Amazon as well.

Anyway, enough promotion! I hope you are all having an excellent December and finding as much comfort in being warm and indoors when it’s so cold out as I am (or cool and indoors when it’s hot out, if you are from the land down under!!!). I am immensely excited for Christmas, not just because Baby is due January 1st, 2014 and could be early, but simply because it’s my favourite holiday.

Does anyone have any good books they’re currently reading? My currently-reading list includes the NIV Archaeological Study Bible (published by Zondervan), A Song of Ice and Fire: A Feast For Crows by George R.R. Martin,Searching: A Research Guide for Writers (edited by Susan Tierney), and my husband Graham and I are just starting the second book in C.S. Lewis’ The Cosmic Trilogy, called either Voyage to Venus or Perelandra, depending on the publication date.

Well, I am done my first book review and Graham is done his final assignment ever for his Bachelor of Arts in History, so we are off to celebrate with popcorn and some Doctor Who. Wishing you all an excellent holiday season and happy reading,
SharaLee Podolecki. ❤ ❤ ❤